Image

Non-Renewable Events Heat Up April

April 2, 2015
Two energy events this April will cover non-renewables. But is every non-renewable turning into a renewable?

Hi Big Idea Engineers,

I wanted to let you know about two energy events coming up this month that will cover non-renewable markets. That’s right, I said it, NON-RENEWABLES!

These energy markets are pivoting as regulations tighten and as researchers uncover new technologies or new uses for the non-renewables. You might even find that every non-renewable is getting one step closer to becoming a renewable, or, at least becoming recyclable. Check them out.

5th Annual Small Modular Reactor Summit

April 14-15, Charlotte NC 

(Readers register here using code SMRENERGY for $300 off)

Nuclear executives across the globe will meet for two days to discuss regulatory issues and economic opportunities available in the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) industry.

Nuclear is the energy answer for many countries looking to reduce carbon footprint. Topics at this summit include the hurdles to making nuclear a mainstream solution like licensing, regulatory framework, and financing.

At the same time, presentations will cover technologies waiting to get approved like the use of Thorium in Molten Salt Reactors. And, on day two of the event you'll hear more about how nuclear can help turn existing nuclear waste into clean energy from Transatomic Power Corporation. Plus, learn from the eGeneration Foundation about the by-products from nuclear like depleting medical isotopes.

Coal Prep

April 27-29, 2015 – Lexington, KY

For all your coal prep and processing needs, this conference and expo will showcase effective techniques and the latest equipment and services to help boost plant productivity and reduce costs. Sessions will cover timely issues for the coal industry such as the effects of Greenhouse Gas regulations in the US, coal as an export, and alternative uses for coal.

Jack Groppo of University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be moderating a forum on the alternative uses.  In summary, Groppo states, “Coal is mainly known for its use in electricity generation, as a basic fossil fuel, it has many other potential uses, particularly in the chemicals industry where it can be converted to liquids, gases, fertilizers, pharmaceuticals, plastics, and a host of other specialty products.  Coal has a long history of being the lowest cost fuel in power generation, but its potential as a low-cost chemical feed stock is still being determined.” 

And, if you think the coal and nuclear industries will never work together, here's some research that says the use of Thorium and coal with a Molten Salt Reactor can produce liquid fuel. http://www.egeneration.org/molten-salt-reactors-coal-industry/

About the Author

Lindsey Frick - Big Idea Engineer | Strategist & Social Entrepreneur

Lindsey Frick is a Mechanical Engineer and Entrepreneur who develops strategies and ideas to solve big problems. She shares her research and experience on new technologies, materials, processes, funding models, and new markets in hopes to inspire other engineers and designers to think big.

Follow her on twitter @BigIdeaEngineer

Sponsored Recommendations

The entire spectrum of drive technology

June 5, 2024
Read exciting stories about all aspects of maxon drive technology in our magazine.

MONITORING RELAYS — TYPES AND APPLICATIONS

May 15, 2024
Production equipment is expensive and needs to be protected against input abnormalities such as voltage, current, frequency, and phase to stay online and in operation for the ...

Solenoid Valve Mechanics: Understanding Force Balance Equations

May 13, 2024
When evaluating a solenoid valve for a particular application, it is important to ensure that the valve can both remain in state and transition between its de-energized and fully...

Solenoid Valve Basics: What They Are, What They Do, and How They Work

May 13, 2024
A solenoid valve is an electromechanical device used to control the flow of a liquid or gas. It is comprised of two features: a solenoid and a valve. The solenoid is an electric...

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of Machine Design, create an account today!