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Linear Actuator Features Continuous Force Rating of 10,000 lbf

Jan. 6, 2015
Curtiss-Wright Corporation announced the expansion of the Exlar FT Series of universal electric rod style linear actuators.

Curtiss-Wright Corporation announced the expansion of the Exlar FT Series of universal electric rod style linear actuators. The series offers high thrust, speed, and robustness in a compact form factor—making them ideal for an alternative to hydraulic cylinders. The actuators have a continuous force rating to 40,000 lbf (178 kN), speed to 60 in/sec (1,500mm/sec) and stroke lengths from 6 inches (150mm) to 8 feet (2,400mm). The new addition, the FT45, has a continuous force rating of 10,000 lbf (44.5 kN) and has a removable front seal bushing design to simplify seal maintenance and replacement. An idler pulley design also helps simplify motor installation and belt tensioning and maintenance. A grease zerk fitting allows for the re-greasing of nut assembly without the need to disassemble the whole unit.

Exlar Corporation (a business group of Curtiss-Wright Sensors & Controls Division), 18400 West 77th Street, Chanhassen, MN 55317, 952-500-6200

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